Getting to Know Eczema




Eczema is one of the most common skin problems in the world. People with eczema usually experience extreme dryness of the skin and rashes. Their skin are red, itchy with some swelling and blistering. There is also crusting, flaking, and cracking. Extreme cases can also lead to bleeding and lesions.

There are many kinds of eczema. It is classified mostly according to the place where it attacks. For instance, the foot or the hand. It may also be classified according to the causes of the eczema. The many classifications of eczema makes understanding of this skin problem harder and more confusing.

One of the most common types of eczema is called atopic eczema. This is an allergic reaction. Itchy rash from eczema can be found on the head, the scalp, the neck the inside of the elbows, behind the knees and the buttocks. Contact dermatitis like this can either be caused by either an allergic reaction or an irritant, for instance detergent.

Another possibility is the Xerotic eczema, which starts with dry skin and then progresses into eczema. Usually, this worsens when the air is cold and dry like in winter. This is also very common with older people.

Another very common type of eczema is the Seborrhoeic dermatitis, which is characterized by the formation of dandruff on the scalp, the eyebrows and even on the face. This kind of eczema is basically harmless except when it happens to babies. In newborns, the cradle cap can lead to thick yellow scalps.

Also a harmless type of eczema is the Dyshidrosis, which is often found on palms and on the sides of the fingers and toes. This worsens in the warm weather.

There is also discoid eczema which can create oozing or dry rash. This is often seen on the lower legs. It becomes worst in winter. Venous eczema, on the other hand, occurs with people with impaired circulation, or those with varicose veins and edema. This is also common to people who are old, over 50 years old. Venous edema is characterized by redness, scaling, itching and darkening of the skin.

Dematitis herpetiformis, another form of eczema, can cause itchiness and rashes on various parts of the body. The skin problem is connected usually with celiac disease and is one of its symptoms. It also tends to get worst at night.

Usually, dermatitis or eczema is treated with medications like corticosteroids. Although the medication does not really cure eczema completely, it does help in suppressing and controlling the problem. These medications have side effects though. One of them is the thinning of the skin, resulting in making it too fragile. Care must also be taken to avoid the eye part. That is why corticosteroids are not given for long periods of time. This is to prevent the side effects from happening. However recent studies show much promise on topical corticosteroids. Topical medications do not seem to affect the skin and does not result in thinning. This is why topical medications are being prescribed for eczema.

 

Eczema Articles

Getting to Know Eczema
Basic Facts and Truths about Eczema
Contact Dermatitis The Eczema You Can Avoid
Treating Eczema the Natural Way
Eczema Prevention Is The Best Treatment
Venous Eczema Attacks Older People
Eczema Basic Causes, Symptoms & Treatments
Sample Ways to Help Treat and Heal Eczema
Averting Eczema Flare-Ups
What You Need to Know if Your Child has Eczema
The Most Common Eczema Atopic Dermatitis
Preventing Eczema Flare-ups in Children
Prevention is Key in Eczema Treatment
What You Need to Know about Eczema Condition and Cure for Kids
The Most Common Eczema Atopic Dermatitis
Eczema And Alternative Therapies
Eczema And The Case Of Occupational Dermatitis
Atopic Dermatitis Eczema Some Myths And Facts
Food Allergies Common Cause of Eczema
How to Treat Eczema

 

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